Frequently Asked Questions

What does ListFriendly.com do?

ListFriendly is an AI for home sellers/buyers looking for an agent. ListFriendly makes for a better home-selling/buying experience; one that’s fast, easy and doesn’t leave money on the table. The right agent should get you there. And Listfriendly AI gives you a list of local agents from best to worst, in context of your home. Listfriendly shows you what to look for and how to interpret each agent’s performance results, so you can make a short list of winners.

Say for example, you’ve gotten three agent names, referrals from friends and family for instance, and you want to do some homework; run their names through ListFriendly - for free - and find out if these agents listed and sold any homes recently, where those homes were located, what kinds of homes they are - are they like yours - how long they took to sell, whether they’re sold for above or below asking, by how much, and more. The best way to solve a problem is to avoid it in the first place; ListFriendly was created to help you avoid hiring problematic real estate agents.

How does ListFriendly work?

Using big data and AI we evaluate most-every sale of most-every home by most-every agent in the United States, noting the: location, type of home, number of bedrooms, listing price, selling price, time on the market, and more. We then process this data to derive seven metrics of performance for every agent, seven dimensions of home-selling skill through which our AI compares agents scientifically( objectively and quantitatively), apples to apples, in light of your home. AI evaluates every local agent who listed and sold a home recently in your area, from best to worst fit for your home. No subjectivity required! Use ListFriendly first to make a short list from all the agents in your area - your list will be comprehensive - include every agent who listed and sold a home in your zip code recently; we don’t cherry pick agents. Step two, interview the winning agents you found on ListFriendly. Now is the time for subjectivity; pick the agent you like best. Some other benefits of using ListFriendly are: transparency, we show you the numbers, explain what they mean and how we use them to rank agents for best fit to your home, anonymity, we keep you anonymous and your contact information confidential to protect you from hard selling, and ListFriendly even offers anonymous texting so that you can ask our member agents questions anonymously from the comfort of your device.

Seven Real Estate Agent Performance Metrics:

  1. How “local” should an agent’s “Local Expertise” be, and is it really important when selling, when buying? Learn More
  2. Experience vs. Personal Attention? Learn More
    1. How can I know if an agent will give me personal attention?
    2. How do I know that an agent is “experienced” enough?
  3. Home Types. Homes are all unique; how do I know if an agent specializes in the same type of home as mine? Learn More
  4. Price Range. Should the prices of the homes an agent usually sells be similar to my home or the home I want to buy? Learn More
  5. Days on the Market. Are agents that sell homes the fastest always better choices when selling a home? ( Days on the Market - Pricing Strategy: Bidding Wars vs. Good Exposure and the Danger of Stale Listings) Learn More
  6. How do I use agents’ sale-to-list ratio to pick the best among them? Learn More
  7. Pricing Strategy. How can I tell if an agent will be on the same page as me when setting a price to sell my home? Learn More
  1. How “local” should an agent’s “Local Expertise” be, and is it really important when selling, when buying?
    In a 2019 Realtor.com consumer survey, 97% of respondents answered that an agent's local market expertise was important; for 25% of respondents, it was the most important trait overall.

    The three most important factors in real estate are “location, location, location.” But location isn’t limited to neighborhood; location within a neighborhood also matters.

    Good local agents consistently take time to tour neighborhood homes for sale, noting things like floorplans, features, and price changes, developing a granular depth of understanding of sold homes over time, accumulating knowledge to gain insight and context for those homes that are for sale.

    But more, because they know local people and other agents, good local agents will also know about homes that will be coming to market, and when, before they’re listed! This information can help you decide when to put your home on the market, or whether to wait before putting in an offer. Good local agents should have substantial knowledge of all of the properties sold, and those that will be selling in their geographical area of expertise.

    Without a good local agent’s in-depth local knowledge, both sellers and buyers may not know how a particular home compares with another seemingly similar home just a block or two away - eg. because of different schools, property tax assessments, neighbors, traffic, flight paths, or what may be important to buyers looking in your neighborhood.

    Without in-depth local knowledge an agent may be unable to accurately account for price differences between seemingly similar homes. Practically speaking, a good local agent can rely on their in-depth neighborhood knowledge to justify counteroffers, and negotiate a deal from a truly informed position.

    The area a good local agent covers must be limited because time is limited, and getting, maintaining, and adding to their knowledge base takes a great deal of time spent “working” the area. It takes time to get to know the people in the neighborhood and then stay current by talking to: homeowners, agents, real estate appraisers, buyers, prospective buyers, escrow officers, mortgage brokers, insurance agents, school personnel, business owners, government workers, and politicians, etc.

    A good local agent adds value to both sellers and buyers by knowing about what’s going on locally, like reading local news, going to local committee meetings, eg. local zoning and planning meetings to keep abreast of local government requirements and upcoming changes affecting development or land use.

    An agent with depth of local knowledge has key insights that aren’t obvious from searching online, which can be very valuable for a seller - for instance - when your agent talks to out-of-area buyers up about your home and its neighborhood, giving them valuable insights to increase interest, insights which the buyer may be unfamiliar with.
  2. Experience vs. Personal Attention?

    Though they may be more popular, the more homes that an agent typically sells, the more likely it is that the agent will not have the time to devote an ideal amount of personal attention to each of their listings; demands on very popular agents' time make delegating to - and relying on - co-agents, team members, and/or assistants more likely, and often unavoidable. Popularity - means good at getting listings - it is not the same skill as, good at home selling.

    Home sellers that don’t want an agent’s assistants, team members or co-agents filling critical rolls may want to forego hiring agents with more - or significantly more - than 12 home sales during the preceding rolling year.

    Agents that sell fewer than four homes during the preceding 12 month period also warrant caution. Listing agents selling an average of less than one home every three months may: not be very good listing agents, be just starting out, be working part time, or be in the process of retiring. The lack of a minimum of four listings sold within the most recent 12 months may also mean that the agent is concentrating on representing buyers. Though some agents excel at representing both buyers and sellers equally well, many don’t; representing buyers requires a very different skill set than that needed to represent sellers.

    All else being equal, agents with between four and 12 recent home sales offer home sellers an optimal balance between experience and personal attention.

  3. Types. Homes are all unique; how do I know if an agent specializes in the same type of home as mine?
    The “Types of Homes Sold” metric is very useful for narrowing the focus of your agent search and also for improving our other metrics’ accuracy, as well as your ability to compare agents and monitor your home while it is for sale.

    Generally, the more homes of the same type as your home that an agent recently sold, the more relevant their experience is to listing, marketing, and successfully selling your home. And, the better they should know what buyers for that type of home are looking for.

    Hiring from agents that sell exclusively, or predominantly your home type is especially important when selling a home type that is underrepresented in your neighborhood; i.e. selling a condo located in a neighborhood where most of the homes are not condos, should logically be entrusted to someone who sells more condominiums in that area than any other type of home.

    Furthermore, some agents are even more narrowly specialized in selling homes within one particular subdivision, complex, or even one building. Find these agents by crossreferencing this “Type of Home” category with our map of an agent’s home sales, above, to identify those agents who are the most specialized for selling your home type at your location. When there are no qualified agents that predominantly sell your type of home, then look at agents with the most experience selling your home type in or around your neighborhood.

    To restate, the more homes of your home type that an agent has sold recently, the more relevant their experience for selling your home. More relevant when it comes to “home type,” also means more accuracy. More relevant means the more you can rely on our metrics measuring that agent’s home-selling performance more accurately (since our metrics will then be calculated from homes sold results from the same type of homes as yours).

    The “Type of Homes Sold” metric is not only useful for narrowing the focus of your search. Also, the more similarity there is between the homes that the agents being compared sold, the more identical the inputs, and therefore the more valid a comparison between such agents’ performance metrics (the outputs) should be.

    Additionally, because there are many agents - many of whom will specialize in homes very different from yours - as you restrict your search to those agents with the most relevant experience (in light of your own home), it becomes more probable that you’ll find more agents with relevant experience selling homes of the same type as yours for the best price, in the shortest time, and with the least amount of hassle and expense. Accurate metrics - derived from recent sales of homes most like your type of home - give the home seller another important resource; the ability to monitor the progress of your home sale while your home is on the market, warning you early of potential problems during that crucial time. By knowing how long your agent’s homes take to sell, you’ll know how long your home should take to sell, for instance.

    For all of these reasons it is a good idea for home sellers to hire listing agents that have significant recent experience selling homes of the same type as their home.
  4. Price Range. Should the prices of the homes an agent usually sells be similar to my home or the home I want to buy?
    Generally, the more homes in the same price range as your home that an agent recently sold, the more relevant their experience is to listing, marketing, and successfully selling your home. And, the better they should know what buyers for homes in that price range are expecting, and ergo how best to prepare your home for sale to meet or exceed buyer expectations.

    Hiring from agents that sell within your home’s price range is especially important when selling a home that is priced significantly outside most other homes of the same home type in your neighborhood, and so should be entrusted to someone whose recent sales are most aligned with buyers for homes at your home’s price point.

    When there are no qualified agents that predominantly sell home’s in your price range in your neighborhood, then look more broadly for agents with the most experience selling within your home’s price range in neighborhoods immediately surrounding your neighborhood. Visit Listfriendly.com; our map will help you do this (it's free).

    The more homes in your home’s price range that an agent recently sold, the more relevant their experience is for selling your home. A more relevant price range for agents’ sold homes translates into more accurate - and reliable - metrics measuring agents’ home-selling performance; our metrics will then be taken from data of homes sold within the same price range as yours.

    The “Price Range” metric is not only useful for narrowing your search. Also, the more similarity there is between the homes that the agents being compared sold, the more identical the inputs, and the more valid the comparison becomes between each agent's performance metrics (the outputs).

    Additionally, because there are many agents - many of whom will specialize in homes priced very differently than yours - as you restrict your search to those agents with the most relevant experience (in light of your own home), the agents you shortlist are more likely to be those who sell homes of the same price point as yours for true value, in the shortest time, and with the least amount of hassle and expense. Accurate metrics - derived from recent sales of homes in your home’s price range - give you - the home seller- one other additional resource; the ability to monitor the progress of your home sale while your home is on the market, with early warning given that something may be wrong, when - for instance - your home takes longer to elicit an acceptable offer than your agent’s recent home selling performance suggests should be the case.

    For these reasons, it is a good idea to hire listing agents that have significant recent experience selling homes in the same price range as your home.
  5. Days on the Market. Are agents that sell homes the fastest always better choices when selling a home? ( Days on the Market - Pricing Strategy: Bidding Wars vs. Good Exposure and the Danger of Stale Listings)
    STALE

    Avoid hiring an agent that has a history of letting their listings go stale, sitting on the market longer than 120 days (including closing). The longer a home sits on the market without getting an offer - or without an offer being accepted - while other similar homes sell more quickly, the more stale the listing becomes.

    The more stale the listing, the fewer home buyers and agents will show an interest in the home; the thinking being that there’s a reason the home didn’t sell, that it’s overpriced, or that there’s something wrong with the home. Thus the longer a home’s time on the market, the less likely it is that new agents and buyers will come to see the home or that buyers and agents that already saw the home will make an offer; its saleability suffers.

    In a seller's market - when there are more buyers than sellers - many agents will begin talking to the homeowner about lowering the price after just two weeks without an offer. Typical time on the market without going stale will be longer when in a balanced market, and longer still during a buyer's market, and always longer for luxury homes, because luxury homes have far fewer buyers.

    The best way to benchmark if your home listing is going stale is to compare your home’s time on the market to how long other homes like yours are taking to sell.

    If your home is taking too long to sell - going stale - you may need to declutter, stage the home, repaint, repair, remodel, take the home off the market for a while and try again, lower the price, hire a different agent; and, any or all of the above.

    Even if you believe that there were some things the agent did, or didn’t do - that the agent is the reason that your home listing has gone stale - getting a new agent by itself will probably not change the fact that your home’s listing has gone stale, not in the minds of agents and buyers.

    The best way to deal with this “stale” situation is to avoid it in the first place by choosing the right agent for your home to begin with. Look for agents that sold between four and 12 homes - during the last 12 months - most of which were the same home type as yours, many of which were in the same price range as yours, and at least some of which were in your neighborhood. Of these, prioritize agents that sell all of their listings in no less than 44 and no more than 120 days; compare these agents' Sale-to-List ratios before you choose. Then look into the agent’s availability to make sure the agent you want isn’t too busy simultaneously selling too many other listings, and last but not least get an appraisal; though there are no guarantees, if you do all of the above, you should be fine (unless your market changes).

    There are many reasons why a home could go stale, and that complicated topic is beyond the scope of this explanation. Two things are certain though. First, if your home has gone stale there is something or a combination of somethings wrong; and second, you need to deal with it decisively - ASAP- if you want to sell your home.

    So then - you might ask - if a lot of listing agents will want the homeowner to lower the price after just 14 days on the market without an accepted offer, why does Listfriendly use 120 days on the market before calling a listing stale? The reason is that your home should sell very close to its appraised price within 120 days, unless there really is something wrong with your home’s desirability, or your agent is a complete zero, or both.

    Notice that, we didn’t say that your home should sell close to its appraised price right away; the fact is, even great agents don’t always get everything right from the getgo, and not all factors are within the agent's control. The market can change. Or three of your neighbors may decide to list their homes at the same time as you. And there can be many other reasons that your home doesn’t fly off the shelf, even in a buyer's market. One difference between a good agent and a poor agent is that the right choice of agent will avoid most of those issues that can be avoided, and also figure out how to pivot to make the needed adjustments to get your home sold before 90 days are up, when it really will start going stale; while a poor choice of agent may not.

    POOR MARKET EXPOSURE

    Especially in a seller's market, many agents sell homes in fewer than 44 days. This can be either because the agent didn’t give the home at least two weeks of market exposure, because closing took less than 30 days, or some of both. Closing can take significantly less than 30 days when the offer is “as is” with no contingencies - like home inspections or appraisal - and is for all cash, with no financing; financing alone can take as long as 40 days, with 18 to 20 days being typical.

    To sell a home very quickly in a seller's market, an agent may set an unreasonably short offer due date, rushing buyers to make offers, and/or create hype around a home, by for instance, advertising an absurdly low asking price; the idea being to increase traffic and create a bidding war.

    Incidentally setting an extremely low asking price artificially inflates the listing agent’s sale-to-list ratio, falsely increasing the agent’s desirability because these agents’ listings sell for a huge premium over the asking price at their much higher actual market value.

    In many instances when a home sells very quickly, the market has not been given enough time or information to establish the home’s true arm's length market price. In order to establish its true price, the maximum number of potential buyers should have the opportunity to learn about the home, visit the home - perhaps several times - and reflect before making an offer. The buyer whose offer is accepted should be given an unrushed opportunity to verify that the assumptions upon which they based their offer were more or less correct, by getting home inspections and an appraisal for instance.

    It’s not just more ethical to sell a home in a way that gives it enough market exposure and doesn’t rush closing, it is also more practical, and often in the best interests of both the seller and the buyer.

    When a home sells super quickly, it may have sold for less than the seller could have gotten. This frequently happens when the seller chooses a lower - all cash, as is, no contingency - offer, over a higher offer contingent on an inspection, a loan, and an appraisal, from a buyer who needs financing.

    Incidentally, a seller armed with an appraisal - done just before putting their home on the market- will know when they review offers, which is the highest offer they can confidently accept; anecdotally the offer from the buyer that needs financing will usually be higher than an all cash offer.

    Alternatively, when a home sells super quickly, it may have sold for far more than its true value or just more than that buyer should have paid, leading to buyers remorse. Buyers often regret making high-dollar purchases, like real estate; cognitive post-decision dissonance sets in when buyers are heavily invested in the consequences of difficult decisions like big-dollar purchases. Buyers remorse can be caused by factors like: the buyer felt they could have waited, the home was purchased in an ethically unsound way, the home was purchased on borrowed money, the buyer is criticized by others for purchasing the home, and/or the buyer later questions the value of the purchased home.

    Cash buyers will often apply for a cash-out refinance loan after an all-cash sale; what happens when the bank appraises their new home for less than they just paid? What happens when it's far less: buyer remorse; then, sometimes, litigation? We live in a litigious society. Why risk it?

    Everyone benefits when you choose an agent who gives the homes they sell a reasonable amount of market exposure and an unhurried closing, without letting their home listings go stale. We recommend those agents who sell homes in an average of between 50 and 80 days, with few if any outlier homes; outliers being those homes that see in less than 44 days or more than 120 days, closing included.

  6. How do I use agents’ sale-to-list ratio to pick the best among them?

    Sale-to-List ratios can be artificially inflated by agents who - for instance - significantly underprice homes to create bidding wars. Since the Sale-to-List ratio simply measures the difference between the asking price and the sale price, the bigger the difference, the higher the agent’s Sale-to-List ratio. The difference between asking price and sale price can be huge when significantly underpriced homes sell for their true at arms-length market price. Agents who significantly underprice homes to create bidding wars have extremely high - and often unjustified - Sale-to-List ratios. Unjustified because Sale-to-List ratios are supposed to measure the agent’s ability to get more than the true at arms-length market price, and not an agent's ability to get market price after a bidding war catalyzed by an absurdly low asking price.

    That’s one reason you should always check if an agent’s Sales-to-List ratio is inflated. Be wary when an agent is consistently selling all of their homes far above asking. To see if this agent has an inflated Sale-to-List ratio, this agent’s Above, At & Below Metric will show you a breakdown of the difference between asking price and sale price for each of this agent’s home sales during the last 12 months.

    Then confirm by looking at the Days on the Market graph on this page; if you see that all or most of an agent's homes sell in less than 44 days, it’s more likely that the agent’s Sale-to-List ratio is inflated due to bidding wars.

    Another problematic Sale-to-List ratio issue to look out for is the total number of homes sold by the agents you are comparing. The number of homes sold by each agent being compared should be roughly equal. Because the Sale-to-List ratio is an average of all of the recent homes an agent sold, the agent who sold one home can have a higher Sale-to-List ratio than an agent who sold 10 homes; accordingly, don’t conclude that the better agent is the one with the highest Sale-to-List ratio unless both agents’ Sale-to-List ratios are based on the sale of a similar number of homes. When you use the Sale-to-List ratio to compare agents that sold a similar number of homes, only then can it help you decide between agents.

    Finally, make sure that the agents you are comparing with the Sale-to-List ratio have each been selling the same Types of Homes, ideally within the same price range. Listfriendly can help you find this information. It’s on each agent’s page. Remember, the agents’ Type of Homes sold and Price Range of sold homes, should match your home as closely as possible. Meaning, your home should ideally be the same type as those that the agents being compared are selling, and also in the same price range as at least some of the homes sold by the agents you are comparing.

  7. Pricing Strategy. How can I tell if an agent will be on the same page as me when setting a price to sell my home?
    Once you’ve narrowed your search to local agents selling homes of the same home type as yours, in your neighborhood, and within more or less the same price range, look at Above At Below to see agents’ pricing strategies and results. Caution, whenever one agent sells similar homes inconsistently - i.e. one home sold above while another sold for below asking -, or whenever different agents use opposite pricing strategies for very similar homes, or whenever an agents list prices diverge much more from selling price than those of other agents, red flag.

    Because a buyers market, a balanced market, and a sellers market can all co-exist in the same neighborhood at the same time, an agent’s pricing strategy (listing above, at, or below the anticipated selling price) may change depending on the type of home and its target selling price.

    Different pricing strategies may be used by different agents in your neighborhood simultaneously, and sometimes to sell very similar homes. Or, an agent may use a particular pricing strategy because of their experience with it, personal preference, or for other reasons. The Above At Below graph lets you see pricing strategy - sold home by sold home - as well as the degree to which the agent set the listing price away from the price that a home sold for.

    Caution When Different Agents Price Similar Homes Differently, eg. One Above and the Other Below the Selling Price

    Take note whenever different agents use different pricing strategies to sell very similar homes in the same neighborhood and in the same +/- 15% price range. Different agents choosing different strategies to sell similar homes - like yours - is something for you to inquire about and think over, a good topic to get into with the agent you’re interviewing.

    Because one pricing strategy is not necessarily superior to another - depending a great deal on the home and the market situation - the takeaway for the home seller is to choose an agent who uses - and is good with - a pricing strategy the home seller is comfortable with, and can live with/see through to the sale. Pricing a home above the market - for instance - may mean that the home will have few visitors, no offers for a long time, and take longer to sell than other similar homes, even in a sellers market. But this strategy can fetch a superior price if the seller can stick with it without panicking.

    Whenever different agents put similar homes - ideally homes like yours - on the market at vastly different prices -on different sides of the expected selling price - ask them to explain the pricing strategy and whether the rationale behind the strategy they used would still apply to your home or whether the market has changed; and if the market has changed ask them to explain how that change would change their strategy.

    Caution When the Same Agent Sells Very Similar Homes One Above And the Other Below Asking Price.

    Pay particular attention when an agent sells similar homes, one above and the other below the listing price. If the agent used the same pricing strategy for both homes, with vastly different results, it follows that something went very wrong.

    If other agents on your shortlist performed more consistently, you may want to consider choosing a more consistent agent. Or if other factors incline you to hire the agent with inconsistent results, delve into the details of the inconsistent sale(s).

    Whenever All Agents Use the Same Pricing Strategy for Homes Like Yours.

    Whenever all of the agents you are looking at use the same pricing strategy, then the market has made the choice of pricing strategy for you, and, since that strategy is one that the market apparently requires and that you can’t control, pricing strategy is not something you need to worry about so much as something you need to accept.

    Next, compare the degree to which - depending on the pricing strategy - your shortlist of agents overpriced or underpriced similar homes that they've sold; a list of all of the homes each agent sold is below at the bottom of that agent's page. For comparison, best to use homes most like yours that sold within 15% of your home’s anticipated selling price.

    Please refer to the article explaining Sale-to-List ratios about how to use Above At Below and Days on the Market to identify a category of agents you may want to avoid.

    Above At Below breaks down the inputs making up an agent's Sale to List ratio, letting you visualize an agent’s pricing strategy by type of home. Above At Below highlights market conditions when divergent strategies may be used effectively to sell similar homes, distinguishing them from those markets when all agents use the same pricing strategies. Finally, checking an agent’s Above At Below lets you identify agents with inconsistent results, who may warrant caution.

Why should I join ListFriendly; what’s the difference between joining and not joining ListFriendly?

When you join, you get AI, which compares every local listing agents’ home-selling performance information to every other listing agents - in context of your home - and gives you an actionable, comprehensive list of every agent in order of best to worst fit for you, saving you time. You won’t need to look at a single statistic unless you want to, but if you want to look under the hood you can.

Without joining, you still get all local agents’ performance information, you can search by zip code or by agent’s name, and learn about each metric and how we use them. Whether or not you join, we keep your contact information confidential, we don’t give it out or sell it to agents, because keeping you safe from hard-selling is one of our founding values. Whether or not you join, you’ll be able to text and call ListFriendly member agents anonymously, though anonymous texting needs a mobile number to make/get anonymous texts, calls.

Why do we want you to join if we don’t sell or give your contact information to agents? When you join, your verified contact information drives our valuation; the more verifiable members we have, the more money we can get to grow and succeed.

  1. Why should I trust the agents you cherry pick, agents they pay you?

    We don’t cherry pick agents. But analyze most-every agent who listed and sold a home recently in the United States, whether they agreed to work with us, or not. With home sale performance data and metrics for almost 700,000 agents - practically every agent who recently sold a home in much of the United States - you get access to all of it whether or not you join. Joining just lets you save time by using our AI to sort local agents from best to worst fit in context of your home. There is no fee to join, unless you hire an agent that works with us and they get a commission from you; in which case they pay a fee. There is no other fee to anyone. If you don’t join, you still get all the data, metrics, and education enabling you to compare agents manually.

    If I give you my information, will you give my contact information to agents? No we don’t do that. One of our non-negotiable value propositions is to keep you anonymous and your contact information strictly confidential to: prevent unwanted sales calls, emails, texts, and even door knocks from overly aggressive agents. The ListFriendly member agents you contact through ListFriendly won’t get your contact information unless and until you give it to them, eg. make a listing appointment.

  2. Anonymous Texting/Calling

    What is Anonymous Texting/Calling: ListFriendly.com’s unique anonymous text/call feature lets home-sellers/ buyers contact real estate agents - who sign up with ListFriendly.com, without disclosing your name or contact information. The idea is to make it easy and stress-free for consumers to take the first step, to be able to ask agents questions and get information from an agent they might not otherwise find, while giving the agent an opportunity to make a good first impression, build trust, and get new business. Agents can block consumers at any time, but not unblock them. Consumers can block/unblock agents at any time.

  3. Why text or call real estate agents anonymously?

    Have you ever bought because a salesperson talked you into it, and not because you needed to. The better the salesperson, the more they trigger our emotions. When looking for a salesperson to make an infrequent, important, high value deal - like buying or selling a home - an additional layer of separation can help you make better hiring decisions. Get the information you want and a sense of the agent you’re thinking about hiring while staying anonymous, and reduce feelings of obligation, prevent: unwanted follow-up messages, door-knocks, calls, and emails.

    Engage on your own terms and at your own pace for a more positive and relaxed hiring experience. Agents with anonymous texting/calling enabled, are happy to chat with you, no strings attached. We don’t disclose your name, address, or contact information to agents during the agent selection process. It’s up to you to do that once you feel comfortable. You can block and unblock an agent at any time.

  4. Why doesn't every agent have an anonymous texting/calling button?

    ListFriendly is a unique, brand new, consumer-centric, data driven, objective, real estate agent hiring space. Any agent may join ListFriendly - and deploy anonymous texting - but most haven’t heard about us yet. Because it’s unhelpful, annoying - and often illegal - to text or call someone without their consent, we only deploy anonymous text/call buttons on member agents’ profiles. That’s why only agents who choose to work with us and want you to text and call them have an anonymous text/call button on their profile.

  5. Why doesn't every agent have an anonymous texting/calling button?

    We display all of our metrics (statistics) to build trust; by showing you what’s under the hood, you can see for yourself exactly how we make decisions. You don’t need to look at a single statistic to use ListFriendly, we give members a comprehensive list of every agent who recently sold a listing in their area, using AI to process metrics and sort every agent in order of best to worst fit to represent your home.

    Subjective decisions based on reviews can be useful where personal opinions and experiences are more important, like choosing a hotel. But when making hiring decisions that affect important financial outcomes, decisions based on objective performance data consistently yield more predictable results; our data on agents’ past performance and availability is useful to narrow the field of dozens or hundreds of possible agents in a given area down to a few candidates, those who are eager to get more work, and have recently done deals for similar homes in your area. Because practically all agents have great reviews, reviews can’t help consumers much when narrowing the field of available real estate agents. Ultimately, the best approach is often a combination of both, our AI’s objective list, followed by interviews of a handful of candidates to get a subjective feel/sense of the agents’ fit for you; you can interview ListFriendly member agents anonymously here, anonymous texting. In conclusion, a comprehensive approach that includes “our statistics” can lead to a more nuanced fit for you and your situation.

  6. What are your fees; what does it cost to register?

    There is no direct fee to you to use ListFriendly, search agents names, get agents’ metrics stats and compare them for yourself; do your due diligence on agents you’re thinking of hiring. We charge the Member Agent you hire a referral fee once your transaction closes. Current information about the fee agents pay us may be found in this agreement.

  7. What are the best questions to ask if I am looking to buy a home?

    Once you get the information you need from our AI, choose a few agents that have done deals for homes like yours in your area recently, with good results. What our data can’t tell you is whether you’ll be comfortable and work well with a particular agent, and that’s what these questions are for. Get the conversation going; some ideas to do that follow. The agent’s answers aren’t as important as the sense you get from the agent, your comfort level. Ask open-ended questions, have a conversation, see how you feel, and compare that to how you feel about other agents. Our AI has already told you a lot about the agent's competence; the finishing touch is to find someone you like on a personal level, someone you feel you can work with.

    1. How do you prefer to stay in touch, text, telephone, or email?
    2. Typically, how long does it take you to get back to clients by text, call, email?
    3. Will you find homes for us to see, or is it our responsibility to find homes we want to see and tell you, or some of both?
    4. Do you use a transaction coordinator? Tell me about them.
      1. The transaction coordinator handles the administrative work of the real estate transaction, the paperwork. This can include preparing and submitting purchase documentation, gathering information or documentation from you (the buyer or seller), communicating with other real estate agents, getting required disclosures in order, and more.
    5. Do you use software like docusign; can forms be completed and signed by us online?
    6. Do you work with a mortgage company, and if so which one? Check them out. You should feel comfortable getting a mortgage from them. They should be a reputable company with good reviews.
    7. Do you work with a team or use an assistant for your buyer client, tell me about them, and what is their role/ are their roles?
    8. How do you guide your client’s offer amount and terms so that your client’s offer has the best chance of being accepted, when there is more than one offer expected for a home?
    9. Do you show open homes to buyers yourself, or do you send your clients to view open houses alone, without you?
    10. Do you expect us to sign an exclusive buyer’s agent agreement, or do you use an open agreement?
    11. How long is your agreement’s typical exclusivity period?
    12. Is your exclusive buyer’s broker agreement limited to a particular area?
    13. Which escrow do you use? Check them out. They should be a reputable company with good reviews.
    14. How do you determine if the price being asked for a home is a fair market price?
    15. When problems have arisen with your purchase transactions, what were they?
    16. How did you solve these problems?
    17. What is your strategy for writing an offer for fair market value on an overpriced home?
    18. What is your strategy for writing an offer on an underpriced home, where sellers expect a bidding war?
    19. How often have your clients canceled their offer to buy a home after its been accepted?
    20. What are some of the terms you typically put into offers to protect your buyer clients, give them a way out?

    These questions are just conversation starters. And - since there is no right or wrong answer - getting answers to them should not be your goal; instead judge answers in light of other agents answers - compare - and just as importantly, get a feel for whether you can work with the agent closely for the months that it will take to ready your home for sale, show it, and sell it.

  8. What are the best questions to ask if I am looking to sell a home?

    Once you get the information you need from our AI, choose a few agents that have done deals for homes like yours in your area recently, with good results. What our data can’t tell you is whether you’ll be comfortable and work well with a particular agent, and that’s what these questions are for. Get the conversation going; some ideas to do that follow. The agent’s answers aren’t as important as the sense you get from the agent, your comfort level. Ask open-ended questions, have a conversation, see how you feel, and compare that to how you feel about other agents. Our AI has already told you a lot about the agent's competence; the finishing touch is to find someone you like on a personal level, someone you feel you can work with.

    1. How do you prefer to stay in touch, text, telephone, or email?
    2. Typically, how long does it take you to get back to clients by text, call, email?
    3. Will you be personally present at every opening of our house, or will other agents be there on your behalf?
    4. Do you use a transaction coordinator? Tell me about them.
      1. The transaction coordinator handles the administrative work of the real estate transaction, the paperwork. This can include preparing and submitting purchase documentation, gathering information or documentation from you (the buyer or seller), communicating with other real estate agents, getting required disclosures in order, and more.
    5. Do you use software like docusign; can forms be completed and signed by us online?
    6. If a buyer is unrepresented will you handle both sides of the transaction yourself “double end it”; how do you protect our interests when you “double end” a sale?
    7. Do you use an assistant or work with a team for your seller clients, tell me about them, and what is their role/ are their roles?
    8. If there is more than one offer, what terms in an offer do you look for other than price before you recommend to your clients that they accept the offer?
    9. Under what circumstances do you advise counter-offering a buyer or buyers?
    10. Given the current market, would you price a home like ours _______________(your home’s location and criteria) above, at, or below its anticipated selling price?
    11. How do you determine what a good listing price is for a typical home you list? Tell us about setting the price for the last home you listed and sold. What was the selling price?
    12. In your opinion, is the market for a home like ours_______________( your home’s location and criteria) a buyers market, a seller’s market, or a balanced market, and why?
    13. How many months is your exclusive listing agreement?
    14. Which escrow do you prefer to use and why? Check them out; they should be a reputable company with good reviews.
    15. When problems have arisen with your sale transactions, what were they?
    16. How did you solve these problems?
    17. How long would a home have to sit unsold for you to ask the sellers to lower the price, given this market?
    18. What ways - other than lowering the price - do you suggest for rejuvenating a listing for a home that has stayed on the market too long without an offer?
    19. Do you offer staging? Which staging company do you usually use? Who covers this cost? Check the staging company out. You should feel comfortable with their work and how their style would fit your home.
    20. What are some of the terms you’ve seen in offers that ring an alarm bell?